Liverpool 2-2 Tottenham Hotspur: Match review

For all the many valid points of praise and criticism one might level at this Liverpool side, there is never, ever a dull moment. It might not be good for the heart, but it makes for a genuinely pulsating spectacle on a regular basis. Their propensity for the ridiculous is unrivaled across the Premier League.

While the previous fixture at Wembley back in October saw Liverpool taken to pieces by a rampant Spurs side, coursing with confidence, Jürgen Klopp and his team have improved immeasurably since, embarking on an 18-match unbeaten run which only recently came to an end following the shock defeat against Swansea.

Having recovered well with a comfortable 3-0 win against Huddersfield in midweek, Liverpool came flying out the traps against Spurs, taking the lead inside three minutes as Mo Salah pounced on an undercooked backpass by Eric Dier, slotting the finish coolly past Hugo Lloris for his 27th goal of the season- making the Egyptian the fastest ever Liverpool player to reach 20 Premier League goals, reaching the landmark in 25 games, overtaking the previous record held jointly by Daniel Sturridge and Fernando Torres (both 27 games).

Liverpool continued to press and harry Spurs into submission throughout the opening 45 minutes, constantly forcing mistakes and asserting their superiority. The final pass, however, was lacking, and the prevailing sense was one of a missed opportunity when the scoreline was still a slender 1-0 lead heading into the break.

To their credit, Spurs were a team transformed in the second-half, as Liverpool appeared lethargic and lacking in intensity as the visitors increasingly cranked up the pressure. There was no route out for Liverpool as Roberto Firmino was unable to sustain his usual energetic defending from the front, while the gaps in the Liverpool midfield grew ever wider and more frequent.

In a bid to halt the shift in momentum, Klopp made two proactive changes in replacing Jordan Henderson (impressive, but only recently returning from injury) and Sadio Mané, with fresh legs in the form of Gini Wijnaldum and Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain. The double change had scant effect on proceedings, however, as Spurs continued to probe in search of the equalizer.

It felt increasingly likely that Liverpool would eventually succumb to the immense pressure they found themselves under, having sat back so passively for the duration of the second-half, allowing Spurs to assert themselves in a manner they weren’t able to in the first-half.

Loris Karius made a superb intervention to deny Heung-Min Son from close range, but the tide eventually could not be held back any longer. The eventual equalizer came not from a carefully carved-out opportunity, but from a 25-yard piledriver from an unlikely source in the substitute, Victor Wanyama, who gave Karius no chance with the thunderous power behind his strike.

Although Karius might have done better to clear the ball with his initial punch from Christian Eriksen’s cross, sometimes one has to simply take their hat off to a truly phenomenal hit- a one in a hundred kind of strike from a player very rarely on the scoresheet.

Seizing the initiative, Spurs continued to pour forwards, this time in search of a winner, as the most chaotic of finales ensued. With three minutes of normal time left to play, Dele Alli slid Harry Kane through on goal, with the ball taking a slight deflection off Dejan Lovren on its way through. Kane made the very most of the opportunity, falling to the ground after the faintest of brushes with Loris Karius, with the striker making sure to initiate the contact

John Moss, the referee, awarded the penalty before consulting his linesman who appeared to point out Kane had been offside. Confusion over the offside rule seemed to preoccupy the pair in discussion, apparently unclear as to whether Lovren’s diversion should have altered the decision. Regardless, Moss was unchanged by the linesman’s comments, standing by his decision.

Kane, one goal short of a century in the Premier League, blasted the ball straight down the middle- a tactic which usually works against most keepers, who either dive to their left or right, rarely remaining central. Karius, however, stood his ground and parried the ball away, as Erik Lamela ballooned the rebound high and wide.

It was an excellent stop by the German who enjoyed arguably the finest performance of his erratic Liverpool career thus far, only enhancing his reputation after having been installed as Klopp’s new number one.

It appeared as though Liverpool had just about done enough to cling on for the draw, but this was only the beginning of a remarkable passage of play in which Liverpool managed to snatch what looked to be a sensational winner, only to relinquish their lead once more in the dying seconds.

Salah, jinking past four Spurs defenders before stabbing the finish high into the roof of the net, delivered a goal of the very highest order- the kind Lionel Messi would be proud of. It deserved to be the winner and it is an enormous shame that such a moment of sheer genius would be overshadowed by what followed.

Just as Liverpool appeared to have secured the three points in stoppage time, Virgil van Dijk- imperious in his all-round performance- dangled a leg in front of Erik Lamela inside the penalty area. It wasn’t the wisest of moves by the Dutchman, although any contact was minimal and the Argentine had no interest in the ball whatsoever, theatrically flinging himself to the ground.

The referee, stood several yards away, was not interested in any penalty claims, only for play to continue for another few seconds before the linesman called the referee’s attention. After another lengthy conversation, the referee this time decided to change his mind based on the linesman’s judgment (who had been stationed much further away from the incident) and overturn his original decision, awarding Spurs a penalty in the 95th minute.

For all the talk of VAR taking too long and breaking up the flow of the game, the referee and his linesman spent an excessive amount of time discussing both penalty incidents on this occasion, both of which were highly dubious to say the very least. Surely, given the technology is available, it would only be sensible for the incidents to be reviewed on a screen so that the correct decisions could be made more often than not, rather than the guesswork which appeared to be at play on this occasion.

This time, Kane made no mistake from the spot as he hit his 100th Premier League goal to snatch a point from Liverpool’s grasp right at the death.

Liverpool could feel hard done by regarding the officials, although the two penalty decisions should not obscure the fact that Spurs were much the stronger side in the second-half as Liverpool failed to manage the game effectively while in front, on two occasions.

On the balance of play, a draw is probably just about the right result, but to save a late penalty and score a stoppage-time goal to go 2-1 in front, only to surrender the victory with barely seconds left on the clock is nonetheless a difficult blow to stomach.

The draw leaves Liverpool still in control of their own destiny and on the face of it, it’s a fairly decent result against a very good side. The manner in which events unfolded, however, means it feels more like a defeat, as Salah’s solo stunner ought to have opened up a much-needed five-point cushion.

As has proven the case on numerous occasions this season, Liverpool couldn’t quite haul themselves over the finish line, and the quest to finish inside the top four for a second consecutive season looks set to be another almighty tussle.

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